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Mecum Monterey 2019: Classiche Certified 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4

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Presented by Mecum Auctions

One of the most enticing fruits of Ferrari’s long association with Italian design house Pininfarina appeared on the stand of the 1964 Paris Auto Salon in the graceful form of the 275 GTB, a car that heralded a new generation of road-going 12-cylinder Ferraris, the first to employ independent rear suspension and the last powered by a single-overhead-cam version of the Colombo-designed short-block V-12 engine, in this case, displacing 3.3L and rated at 280 HP at 7,600 RPM. Heavily influenced by the 250 GTO and midengined 250 LM, the 275 GTB’s gorgeous bodywork featured the GTO’s familiar long-hood, short-tail fastback silhouette rendered with a higher fender line, more gently sloping contours and the sweeping wraparound windshield first seen on the 250 LM racing prototype.

One of the most enticing fruits of Ferrari’s long association with Italian design house Pininfarina appeared on the stand of the 1964 Paris Auto Salon in the graceful form of the 275 GTB, a car that heralded a new generation of road-going 12-cylinder Ferraris, the first to employ independent rear suspension and the last powered by a single-overhead-cam version of the Colombo-designed short-block V-12 engine, in this case, displacing 3.3L and rated at 280 HP at 7,600 RPM. Heavily influenced by the 250 GTO and midengined 250 LM, the 275 GTB’s gorgeous bodywork featured the GTO’s familiar long-hood, short-tail fastback silhouette rendered with a higher fender line, more gently sloping contours and the sweeping wraparound windshield first seen on the 250 LM racing prototype.

After introducing a Series II version with a hood bulge and longer nose, exterior trunk hinges for increased luggage space, and without a driver’s vent window, Ferrari returned to the Paris show in 1966 with a much-revised model that, while almost identical in both appearance and mechanical specification, had a new four-cam version of the Colombo V-12 closely patterned after that of the P2 prototype. This was the 275 GTB/4, the first road-going Ferrari with dual overhead cams on each cylinder bank. With 9.5:1 compression, dry-sump oiling, Magneti Marelli dual-distributor ignition and its standard fitment of six Weber twin-choke 40 DCN carburetors, the new engine produced 300 HP at 8,000 RPM and 232 lb-ft of torque at 6,000 RPM, propelling the GTB/4 to upwards of 160 MPH.

By every measure, the 275 GTB design is one of the most stunning pieces of automotive design the world has ever seen, a beautiful blend of form and detail that has stood through the years as a tribute to Pininfarina’s genius. The four-cam GTB/4 took the driving experience to an entirely new level. It could be driven all day at high speed without the exhaustion normally associated with such an undertaking, inspiring one contemporary reviewer to describe it as “the most satisfying sports car in the world.”

Chassis No. 10735, this magnificent 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 is a late production European-spec example completed in December 1967 with Bianco Polo paint, a Rosso VM 3171 leather interior, rear-window defroster and power windows. It was delivered new in January 1968 through Franco-Britannic Autos in Paris to a French surgeon in Chambéry.

In the fall of 1970, the car was in an accident in the French Alps, after which it was sold to a dealer in Montlhéry. In the late 1970s, it was sold to a German owner who had it completely rebuilt. In March 1984, it was advertised for sale in the German magazine “Auto Motor Und Sport” with the following description: “Ferrari 275 GTB/4, one of the last ones, Chassis number 10735, completely dismantled, fully galvanized, and then totally rebuilt, all new and original, nitro paint Rosso Chiaro, cream Connolly leather, unique collector piece, asking German Marks DM 300’000, Telephone 02406/7636 or 2071.”

No. 10735 remained in German ownership until 1986, when it was imported to the U.S. by marque expert Ron Spangler of Prancing Horse Farm in Bel Air, Maryland. Spangler then sold it to Gie Liem of Philadelphia, who commissioned a painstaking nut-and-bolt restoration that saw it finished in Rosso with a Pelle Nera leather interior and gray carpeting.

As documented in the detailed Ferrari Classiche “red book” that accompanies the car, the chassis, body, engine, gearbox/differential, suspension and brakes are original to the car, with correct, original factory stampings and tags. The original alloy wheels were replaced with a correct and very clean set of Borrani RW 4039 14×7-inch alloy wire wheels fitted with correct Michelin XWX 205/70VR14 radial tires. Thorough inspection confirms the car’s excellent paint, brightwork, glass and overall fit and finish, as well as the highly detailed and correct interior, engine compartment and undercarriage.

An exquisite example of one of the most significant and desirable Ferrari road cars, 275 GTB/4 No. 10735 earned Ferrari Certification in 2018 and is offered with a Massini report, books, records and tools.

This vehicle will be offered by Mecum as LOT F119 during their Monterey event, running from August 15-17.

Presented by Mecum Auctions

Mecum Auctions is now headquartered in Walworth, Wisconsin, and since 2011 has been ranked No. 1 in the world with number of collector cars offered at auction, No. 1 in the world with number of collector cars sold at auction, No. 1 in the U.S. with number of auction venues, No. 1 in the U.S. in total dollar volume of sales, and is host to the world’s largest collector car auction held annually in Kissimmee, Florida.

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